Friday, March 02, 2012

Haynaku: a new favorite poetic form of mine


New Haiku Form: Haynaku*

Pain
in the
neck is real.

Kitchens
cost more
than a house.

Walruses
ate her
teeny, weeny bikini.

Headbands
hurt only
a little while.

His
wedding band,
shiny and cold.

Katherine Gotthardt
February 8, 2012

How
do I
love thee? Agape.

Sad
journal, replaced
by a blog.

Quick
poetry, cup
of instant coffee.

Thick
lipped snow
French kissing windows.

When
did you
punch that wall?

Katherine Gotthardt
February 11, 2012

This
old cat
meowing all night.

Getting
up still
wins first prize.

Katherine Gotthardt
February 16, 2012
 
Ears
screaming rings.
Can't you hear?

Now’s
the end
of the line.

Katherine Gotthardt
February 28, 2012

I
posted, "Abusers
need not apply."

Katherine Gotthardt
March 2, 2012


 *Haynaku: a form invented by poet Eileen Tabios, who is also publisher, Meritage Press.
  • Officially inaugurated on the Web on June 12th, 2003 (Philippine Independence Day).
  • The form spread through the Web to poets all over the world.
  • Eileen Tabios initially called the form "the Pinoy Haiku".
  • Vince Gotera proposed the name "hay(na)ku", and this name has stuck. This corresponds to a Tagalog phrase that means roughly "Oh!" or (in Spanish) "Madre mía".
  • The last syllable is pronounced "ai" (silent aitch, like Cockneys would say it).
In a traditional Hay(na)ku, there are:
  • A tercet: 3 lines.
  • A total of 6 words: 1 in the first line, 2 in the second line, and 3 in the third line.
  • There is no restriction on syllables or stressed or rhymes.
Variations:
  • In the 'reverse' haynaku, the longest line is placed first and the shortest last. The total is still 6 words: 3 in the first line, 2 in the second line, and 1 in the third line.
  • Multiple hay(na)ku can be chained to form a longer poem.
http://www.baymoon.com/~ariadne/form/haynaku.htm
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